Job Opportunities through Basic Services (JOBS)

March 14, 2013 ANERA
Categories:
Agriculture, Economic Development, Education, Environmental Projects, Job Creation, School Infrastructure, Water and Sanitation, West Bank
Locations:
With $4 million from USAID, ANERA created short-and long-term jobs over a three-year period through labor-intensive agricultural and infrastructure development activities.

The Reality

Palestinian communities throughout the West Bank suffer from high unemployment rates. With rising prices for dietary staples, oil, and gas, the situation is not sustainable. Men and women who wish to join the workforce are in desperate need of training to prepare them for employment in various sectors.

ANERA’s Response

ANERA received a $4 million grant from USAID to implement the Job Opportunities through Basic Services (JOBS) program. The aim of the program was to create both short-and long-term employment opportunities over a three-year period through labor-intensive agricultural and infrastructure development activities.

How It Worked

The four-year project started in 2003. ANERA completed more than 70 projects in the areas of water conservation, sanitation, agriculture market access roads, school construction, community and youth development, environmental protection and cultural heritage restoration. Project activities were mainly concentrated in the Jordan Valley. When the work was complete, some 190,000 people directly benefited from the program.

Meet Some People Who Have Benefited

420 girls attend this new school ANERA built with USAID funding in Bardala, West Bank.Bardala Girls’ School Headmistress Ms. Fadwa Sawaftah: “Before building the school, we used to notice a big drop in girls’ enrollment after the eighth grade. Many families prevented their girls from going to the coed high school in the village, which is religiously conservative. But this year, we noticed an increase in the numbers of girls attending higher grades.” Read more >>

 

A decorative wheel carved from stone sits at ancient site of Hisham's Palace near Jericho, West Bank, dates back 1,300 years.

Mr. Khamis, ticketing officer at Hisham’s Palace: ”I used to see visitors coming here and staying for less than 10 minutes and then leaving. Today, they stop and visit the site with happiness and curiosity to learn more about it.” Read more >>