Syrian Refugees Forge Futures with Non-Formal Education in Lebanon

February 16, 2017 ANERA
Categories:
Education, Lebanon, Vocational Training
Locations:
Itab Malas teaches math, English, Arabic and life skills as part of non-formal education in Lebanon. Itab Malas teaches math, English and Arabic.

ANERA offers basic literacy, math and vocational courses to refugee youth and other impoverished communities.

Below, we highlight three stories about Syrian refugees who benefited from non-formal education in Lebanon. The program is implemented in partnership with UNICEF and made possible through funding from German CooperationUK Aid, and the United States Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration.

Rania: Young Mother in Bhannine

Rania dropped out of school more than a decade ago, when she was in the sixth grade in Syria. Today, she’s a refugee in Bhannine, Lebanon. When she heard of ANERA’s literacy and math courses, her only concern was finding a safe space to leave her five-year-old daughter Amal.

Now, Rania and a group of young mothers are enjoying ANERA’s courses while their children are in daycare at the center.

“I heard about the classes from my neighbors and was so eager to join,” said Rania. “These classes gave me some hope that there’s something to look forward to, and it’s never too late to go back to school.”

Rania enrolls in ANERA's courses in non formal education in Lebanon while her daughter goes to day care.

Rania is able to attend ANERA’s courses because she can put her daughter in daycare at the school.

Abdo: Football Coach for Refugee Youth

Abdo fled from his hometown of Zabadani, Syria to Majdal Anjar in Bekaa, Lebanon. Initially a social sciences teacher, he couldn’t find any employment opportunities to support his younger sister and sick mom.

Abdo heard of ANERA’s skills training courses in Bekaa, particularly the courses for sports trainers. As a former trainer for the Shabab Al Zabadani football team in Syria, he applied to be one of the trainees.

Now, Abdo is one of the trainers who oversees ANERA’s sports learning courses in football in Bekaa. “I manage two training sessions per week. I enjoy this greatly on one hand and, on the other, the income I receive helps me provide for my family.”

Abdo learned coaching as part of ANERA's non-formal education in Lebanon program.

Abdo attends a football training session for his students.

Khaled: Computer Technician

Khaled, 18, dropped out of school in seventh grade. He regrets it now, and that’s why he started looking for alternative education options.

When Khaled heard about ANERA’s non-formal education courses in Lebanon, he was quick to enroll in courses on literacy, math and computer skills. Now Khaled works at a computer shop close to his home in Tripoli and makes around $50/week.

“After I dropped out of school I worked in many different jobs, but working in computer maintenance always interested me,” said Khaled. “Though I’ve started with some minor chores and clerical support, I believe this is an opportunity to change my future.”

Khaled stands in front of the computer shop where he works.

Khaled stands in front of the computer shop where he works.

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